Fellows of Jonathan Edwards

A (5) | B (11) | C (4) | D (1) | E (6) | F (5) | G (2) | H (11) | J (2) | K (3) | L (6) | M (5) | N (2) | O (2) | P (5) | R (2) | S (6) | T (1) | U (1) | W (8) | Z (1)

Susan Cahan


Bio:

Susan Cahan, Associate Dean for the Arts in Yale College and a resident fellow in JE, would enjoy meeting with students who are interested in contemporary visual art, both art making and art history. Through her experiences working at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York and as a curator for a large private art collection, she has had the opportunity to get to know many fascinating artists, including Andrea Fraser; Felix Gonzalez-Torres; Jim Hodges; Vik Muniz; Cathy Opie; Tim Rollins; Fred Tomaselli; Carrie Mae Weems; and others. She would be happy to talk with students pursuing studies or career paths in art, art history, and museum work. susan.cahan@yale.edu

Steve Chang


Bio:

Steve Chang is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neurobiology. He has been at the forefront of using live social interaction paradigms in rhesus macaques for investigating the neural mechanisms of social decision-making and also examining how social motivation could be improved by neuromodulators both at the behavioral as well as at the level of single neurons. He hypothesizes that our social behaviors are heavily reinforcement-driven. He received Ph.D. from Washington University Neuroscience Program, and completed his postdoctoral work at Duke University. Steve teaches neuroscience-related courses from the Department of Psychology. Steve is happy to chat with anyone interested in psychology and neuroscience. steve.chang@yale.edu

Oswaldo Chinchilla


Bio:

Oswaldo Chinchilla Mazariegos is an Assistant Professor at Yale University, Department of Anthropology, and formerly professor at the University of San Carlos and curator at the Museo Popol Vuh, Universidad Francisco Marroquín, Guatemala. His research focuses on Mesoamerican art, religion, and writing, and he has conducted extensive field research at various sites in Guatemala, focusing especially on the settlement patterns, urbanism, and sculptural art of the Pacific Coastal site of Cotzumalhuapa. In 2011, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for his work on Cotzumalhuapa art and archaeology. His recent work on Mesoamerican religion and art has resulted in a series of innovative papers, and the book Imágenes de la Mitología Maya (2011), which examines mythological themes in Maya, in the light of a broad, comparative assessment of relevant sources that include the Popol Vuh and other narratives from all over Mesoamerica. In addition to numerous articles in major journals, he is the author of Cotzumalguapa, la Ciudad Arqueológica: El Baúl-Bilbao-El Castillo (2012), Guatemala, Corazón del Mundo Maya (1999); editor of Arqueología Subacuática: Amatitlán, Atitlán (2011); and coeditor of The Decipherment of Ancient Maya Writing (2001), and The Technology of Maya Civilization: Political Economy and Beyond in Lithic Studies (2011).

Dr. Roger Colten


Bio:

Dr. Roger Colten is the Senior Collections Manager for the Anthropology Division at the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University and an archaeologist who specializes in the study of coastal and island sites, focusing on the analysis of vertebrate animal remains (bones).  While his dissertation research focused on Native American adaptations to coastal environments in southern California, he has more recently analyzed museum collections from Europe and Cuba that are housed at the Peabody Museum.  In addition to his museum collections research he has participated in archaeological field projects in California, Germany, Israel, Italy, Malta, Michigan, and Nevada.  He has worked in several other museums including the Fowler Museum of Cultural History at UCLA and the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian. He would be happy to talk with students about the Peabody Museum, museum collections research, or archaeological field work. roger.colten@yale.edu