Dean’s Office

Dean Joseph C. Spooner

Position

The Dean is chief academic adviser to the approximately 420 undergraduates assigned to JE. Residing within the college, he assists students in all matters concerning their academic programs, applies and enforces the Academic and Undergraduate Regulations that govern student behavior, works in conjunction with the Registrar’s Office and the Yale College Dean’s Office, and supervises freshman advising. As needed, he refers students to resources, offices, or persons that can be of assistance to them, and actively collaborates with these sources of support and counseling. He writes letters of recommendation for fellowships or postgraduate-work or study. He also teaches one course a year, serves on a range of University committees, oversees student housing, and coordinates a variety of college activities. The Dean is also a great resource for a wide range of other matters and advises students on everything from personal crises to post-graduation plans. In cases of incapacitating illness or family emergency, the Dean has the authority to postpone deadlines for academic work or final exams.

Email: joseph.spooner@yale.edu
Phone: 203-432-0377

About

Twenty-one years after earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Yale College, Dean Spooner happily returns to New Haven to support JE students in their academic, co-curricular, and personal pursuits.  Since his transformative undergraduate experience, Dean Spooner has held various teaching and administrative positions at a community college, a public research university, and a small liberal arts college.  A first-generation college student from a small family farm in northern Florida, he has not forgotten how overwhelming and foreign Yale can be, and hopes that his varied experiences in higher education will benefit all of those fortunate enough to call JE home. 

Most recently, Dean Spooner has lived in Edinburgh, writing a PhD thesis in American History and relishing his ‘it’s never too late to do it’ study abroad opportunity.  Students should not be surprised if veggie haggis and toffee pudding suddenly appear on dining hall menus, but should not worry about the dean donning a kilt and bagpiping at sunrise.  He hopes that, over time, many in the JE community will come to share his profound appreciation for the revitalizing powers of sleep and quality downtime.

Jill Haines